Category

Veterans

Category

by Martin Rand, III, The Brunswick News
special to InMilitaryEducation.com

Forrest Gump said “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get.”

But for Bill Smith, life is a bunch of projects.

One project after another has kept his life moving forward.

After Smith, a Navy veteran, was done fighting in World War II, he received a GI Bill grant to attend veterinarian school. He graduated in the early 1950s.

Interview with Arthur Rodriguez, MGySgt, USMC (Ret)
Outreach Educational Coordinator, American Military University

Making the leap from a military to civilian career can involve some juggling, but with the right amount of support and resources it can be a smooth transition. To talk about making this leap is Art Rodriguez, a retired Marine and a Vietnam Veteran with more than 30 years of service.

For a second consecutive year, Booz Allen Hamilton is the top employer for veterans, according to new market data collected by Payscale.com. That means the Virginia-based defense and civil contractor employs the greatest number of former military service members in skilled labor positions.

Booz Allen Hamilton, commonly known as Booz Allen, provides consulting services to the U.S. government in defense, intelligence, and civil markets, and to major corporations, institutions, and not-for-profit organizations. Nearly one third of the company’s 25,000 employees have military backgrounds.

First lady Michelle Obama announced Tuesday that companies participating in a program to help veterans find work have hired or trained 290,000 veterans and military spouses since August 2011, nearly tripling the original goal of the program with about eight months to spare.

Obama said Tuesday that the program called Joining Forces has also generated pledges from businesses to hire or train another 435,000 in the next five years.

The White House announced a significant new effort Tuesday to reduce unemployment and improve job prospects among veterans, enlisting the support of U.S. companies to hire 435,000 veterans and military spouses over the next five years.

Retail giant Wal-Mart, the Blackstone private-equity firm and shipper UPS are among the major American brands that are committing to hiring hundreds of thousands of veterans and spouses, officials said. Wal-Mart previously announced that it would find a job for any veteran discharged honorably in the year he or she leaves the service.

Companies participating in a program to help veterans find work have hired or trained 290,000 veterans and military spouses since August 2011, nearly tripling the original goal of the program with about eight months to spare, according to the White House.

First lady Michelle Obama said Tuesday that the program called Joining Forces has generated pledges from businesses to hire or train another 435,000 in the next five years.

Tech jobs for veterans

First lady Michelle Obama on Monday announced the launch of a credentialing program that the White House says will help members of the armed forces who are leaving military service earn the certification needed for many high-tech jobs in the private sector.

Many departing service members have faced problems landing high-tech jobs in the private sector despite military training and experience in the field because they lack the proper civilian certification. The new program is aimed at assisting veterans to begin careers in fields such as computer programming and software development.

First lady Michelle Obama visited Annapolis on Wednesday, April 17,  to praise a new Maryland law, saying it sets a national standard for removing barriers for veterans in transition to the civilian workforce.

The legislation — unanimously approved by the General Assembly — was signed into law by the governor Wednesday as Obama looked on. It requires agencies to expedite the processing for veterans of 70 professional licenses, including those for nurses, paramedics and teachers.

Vince Patton, Ed.D.
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard, USCG Retired

So – to fight boredom during my underway time, and to pretty much stay out of my chief’s constant torment of verbal abuse, I began taking USAFI courses. I got into it, and really enjoyed it. My communications officer always checked on me and continued to encourage me in taking my courses. Whenever I finished a lesson or module, the communications officer would make a big deal of it in front of the entire Operations Department, and eventually got the commanding officer and executive officer to join in with his personal cheerleading sessions. It was actually quite embarrassing to me, as I couldn’t figure out why they are making a big deal out me, when others on the ship were also taking USAFI courses.