Category

Tuition Assistance

Category

With the exception of the Navy, the popular Military Tuition Assistance program came to a screeching halt recently due to the Federal Sequestration.  After a congressional mandate and the backing of the President, the Army and Air Force reopened the tuition assistance program, and recently the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard restored tuition assistance to pre-sequestration numbers for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013.

One of the big benefits of the Post 9/11 GI Bill is the benefit’s transferability. Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits can be transferred to family members of our servicemembers, enabling children and even spouses to use the benefit to finance their education.

But beginning on August 1, 2013, servicemembers will have to serve an additional four years to transfer the benefits.

The Air Force has restored open enrollment of a popular tuition assistance program thousands of Wright-Patterson active-duty airmen have used to pay for college degrees.The Air Force, faced with a forced cut of more than $10 billion before October because of automatic budget cuts known as sequestration, suspended new enrollments March 11. Under pressure from the Pentagon, the Army and Marine Corps took the same actions, but the Navy held firm and didn’t follow the other services lead.

By Jim Sweizer
Vice President, Military Relations at American Military University

The U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps have canceled military tuition assistance (TA) programs as a result of the federal sequestration and a recent memo sent to each branch by the DoD comptroller suggesting significant reductions be made to their respective TA programs.

Vince Patton, Ed.D.
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard, USCG Retired

As we approach the chief radioman’s stateroom, Flanagan (Scott’s his first name, but everyone called each other by their last name that few of us ever knew what the first name was) gave me a quick revised ‘how to report aboard’ line, and told me with all sincerity, “forget what they taught you in RM school – this is how it’s done out here in the REAL COAST GUARD.” So, all I had to do was just say to the chief, “I’m Patton, your new radioman reporting aboard.” So – I knocked on the chief’s stateroom door, and about a second after the knock, I hear this gravelling yell, “WHAT DUH YA WANT!” in a rather southern-type drawl. I repeated what Flanagan told me to say. It was rather interesting that after hearing the yell from the other side of the door, Flanagan sort of ‘takes off’ at Mach speed. The stateroom door opens, I get a quick split second glance of the chief, and immediately the door is slammed in my face.

Vince Patton, Ed.D.
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard, USCG Retired

Nelson Mandela’s quote is appropriate as far as defining my own academic success.  In February, 1973, having just graduated from Coast Guard Radioman ‘A’ School in Petaluma, CA, I reported to my first assignment, the 378 foot high endurance cutter, USCGC DALLAS, which was at the time homeported at Governors Island, NY, a small tiny paradise that sits just a ½ mile or so from the southern tip of Manhattan.

 

By Craig Gilman
Faculty Member at American Military University

The You Served For America, Now Teach For America initiative aims to bring top military professionals to our nation’s highest-need schools by partnering with branches of the military and veterans’ organizations to identify candidates for the program. Former U.S. Army staff sergeant and 2009 Teach For America alumnus Shaun Murphy will lead this new initiative and has a goal of tripling the number of military participants in the next two years.